#90Seconds: What Would You Do If You Were In That Metro Car?

photoIt’s the kind of thing you should never have to worry about, but still, the thought occurs to some of us often enough – what if I get trapped in this Metro or a subway? What if it stops in a tunnel and we’re underground, maybe under water – and I can’t get out? That exact scenario happened just this week. A Metro train stopped, filed with smoke, people got sick, some panicked, and it took about 40 minutes for help to come.

A 61-year-old woman named Carol Glover of Alexandria died of smoke inhalation. 80-plus people went to the hospital. The video of countless people coughing inside the train, and walking around with soot on their faces outside the train is haunting. Right now, there’s a lot of speculation about why it happened, and why it took that amount of time for help to come. I don’t want to add to the speculation. We’ll know soon enough. And that’s not the reason for this post. What I do want to talk about is the concept of “what would you do?”

What would you do if despite your discomfort, another person nearby looked even worse off than you? This, in my humble opinion, is when character takes center stage. Jonathan Rogers of DC saw Carol Glover fall to her knees, and he and two other people gave her CPR for 20 minutes. They wouldn’t stop, even when she didn’t seem to have a pulse. They sacrificed what little breath they had to help another person they didn’t know, and even though Jonathan hardly remembered how to administer CPR, he didn’t let that stop him. He and 2 other riders figured it out and gave to a person who, like they, was unexpectedly plunged into a situation she didn’t bargain for that day. No one on that train ever expected they’d face such despair and uncertainty. And in a city where you can feel so isolated, like we don’t have any connection to our fellow man, Rogers stepped up. In doing so, he set an example for the entire metropolitan area, and the world. Please watch his heartfelt story – and share it.

We all need to go the extra mile for our fellow brother or sister, even if they don’t look like us, or we have never met them before. Because our loved ones would want someone to step up and help us, wouldn’t they? They absolutely would.

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